persephone20: (a tree)
This book is like Francesca Lia Block and Melissa Marr teamed up to write the book of my dreams.

Well no, actually, it's not as good as all that. But it has elements of both writers which is giving me a nostalgic zing. The intrigue of a Faerie book written after a War between humans and faeries sometime in the near future keeps me turning pages.

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Actually, I can do better than that. In my teenage years, I read a lot of books by Sherryl Jordan. While a beautifully evocative author, her books were a little bit sameish on theme: stories were often about outcasts and, much of the time, they would be set in some post-apocalyptic world/historical world. Both backdrops had much the same feeling.

With Janni Lee's first book, Bones of Faerie, I'm getting a bit of that vibe. The main character, Liza, is an immediately sympathetic character. Supporting characters are vivid. It is not just the bits and pieces of information on the humans vs faeries War that keeps me turning pages.

I know that, in a year or so, Melissa Marr's first book Wicked Lovely is going to be released as a movie. Around that time, there is going to be multitudes of fanfic flying up all over the place. In the meantime, though, this book is making me want to take that characters from that universe (because I am too busy to think up original characters, naturally) and put them into the situation of War against the humans. \

A part of me is hoping that Janni Lee's sequel novel, Faerie Winter, is going to be a prequel -- much like Malinda Lo's Huntress was a prequel/sequel of her Cinderella story Ash -- but a bigger part of me somehow doubts it.
persephone20: (the last thing you'll ever see)
I just recently purchased one of the signed hard cover editions of 'Darkest Mercy', waiting patiently -and sometimes not so patiently- for it to be shipped over and arrive here in Australia. When it did arrive, I hugged the book to me for a while, and then commenced reading it. Had I not had work towards my English Honours to get done, it would not have been closed again before I finished it.

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I was raving about this series online last night, but the re-tweet I just received that acted in reply to a separate question just about made my morning.

Me: @melissa_marr did polyamory!!! An author of YA fiction did polyamory without stuffing it up!!
Melissa: Belated reply 2 "what r the boundaries in YA?" RT: @persephone20: "@melissa_marr did polyamory!!! An author of YA fiction did polyamory..."


Two things are amazing about this. One: an author that I think a lot of -and would love to study next year in regards to the re-emergence of faerie fiction, particularly in YA fiction- read my comment and replied to me, and Two: it feels like times, they may be a-changing.

That a YA author would not only just bring out a series of books where a polyamorous trio featured as part of a main section of plot, but would then announce that it is a boundary that can easily be crossed in YA seems like a fantastic step into the future for me.

For a while now, I have been looking with dissatisfaction at the common 'love triangle' trope that seems to appear again and again and again in both books and TV shows in the YA genre. Lately, that trope's been becoming a little bit more interesting in such TV shows as Glee where one side of the current love triangle is a girl who's in love with her best friend (another girl).

I guess for me, seeing polyamoury being written into a book like this, without fanfare or controversy, feels to me like I imagine it might have felt to others when the first gay/lesbian couples started appearing in novels as just another option on the kinds of romantic relationships that can be had between people. In Melissa's books, this touching relationship was shown as neither good, nor bad, but just as three people who happened to all love each other individually, having many of the same concerns within that trio as would be had between a couple.

In short: Go Melissa. I think you're doing a great job and I cannot wait to get my hands on the last of the manga books in your 'Desert Tales' series.

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persephone20: (a tree)
I love Melissa Marr.

After at first being loaned the first book in the series by the friend of an ex-housemate of mine, I have since sought out that book, the rest of the series, including the eBook editions that have been promoted on her livejournal and graphic novels that she's released in the same world.

But the reason I make this post is because of a conversation I was having with [personal profile] coquilleon yesterday (one of many, so many, conversations) about how the gay element is getting represented more and more often in teen shows. We had it in Buffy, which was the first time I really noticed it but that reveals my age more than anything else. There's been Skins; at the moment there is Glee, and we were talking about an interview where they'd posited introducing it in The Vampire Diaries (which I think could be amazingly interesting, if only because it's something that wasn't acknowledged in the books).

At this, I believe my retort was that it would be nice to see polyamorous... arrangements represented, then lightly tagged that it would probably be another couple of decades until we got to the point with polyamory in the media that we are currently at with gay representation. At which the fast becoming stock-standard of polyamory, Big Love, was paraded, and I grouched about that, then went to bed.

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Heading gradually back around to the first line of this post: I love Melissa Marr. On the eBooks that I have collected from her is the mini series 'Stopping Time' that follow on from her full length novel Ink Exchange. Now this is a great little bit just because it shows the love felt for one character by two different characters, without the need to make it into a love triangle where one gets the girl and the other.. well, doesn't. And as I'm reading this morning's review of the conclusion to Marr's series -linked by Melissa herself- I find myself getting a little excited.

Certain... "er... arrangements" are said to be satisfied in this book. Pairings and... "er... arrangements", and this gives me hope, not the least for a new variation in an old staple of young adult books. But also for having a chance to see my lifestyle represented in the fiction I choose to read.

And while there's a part of me that can't help but think I've horribly recontextualised Marr's meaning in the writing of this .... arrangement, for myself I choose live in hope!

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